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  Name Title
Benjamin Albee Albee, Benjamin Fine Arts Teacher
John Deedy Deedy, John Fine Arts Department Chair
Michael Fleming Fleming, Michael Fine Arts - Studio Art

The goal of this course is to provide the beginner student with an introduction to the standard elements of studio art. Technique development is emphasized through drawing. Students will create a series of drawings with a focus on three specific techniques to create space in a composition overlapping line, gradation of tone and rendering objects larger in perspective (1 Semester).

Expanding on the standard elements of studio art as described in the junior high course, this course advances student artistic techniques through more complex applications. Composition renderings incorporating linear perspective, tone, and color will be explored. Project based assessments will include still-life, human figure, landscape and portrait in developing student content and skill-set (1 Credit).

Building upon the curricular elements of Studio Art I, this course continues student development of the methodologies of drawing techniques. The course expands student comprehension through a focus on illustration as a means of communication to an audience. Composition projects will include typography, story boards, branding, and logo design. Prerequisites include successful completion of Studio Art I, teacher recommendation, and department chair approval (1 Credit).

The goal of this course is to integrate the previously studied curricular objectives of Studio Art I & II with the standards of art criticism and critical thinking skills in two and three-dimensional design. Studio activities include drawing, painting, sculpture, two, and three-dimensional designs as well as art history. Special attention is given to developing a portfolio for students interested in art as a career. Prerequisites include successful completion of Studio Art II, teacher recommendation, and department chair approval (1 Credit).

This College Board Advanced Placement course is designed to successfully prepare students for the AP Studio Art exam through collegiate level coursework. Students create a portfolio of work to demonstrate inquiry through art and design and development of materials, processes, and ideas over the course of a year. Portfolios include works of art and design, process documentation, and written information about the work presented. In May, students submit portfolios for evaluation based on specific criteria, which include skillful synthesis of materials, processes, and ideas and sustained investigation through practice, experimentation, and revision, guided by questions. Students may choose to submit any or all of the AP Portfolio Exams. Primary emphasis is placed on portfolio production as articulated by AP standards. The portfolio is one that would serve as a formal submission for admission to a Fine Arts program at a higher educational institution. All students enrolled in the course must take at least one of the AP Studio Art exams at the end of the school year. Prerequisites include the recommendation of the Studio Art III teacher and department chair approval (1 Credit).

The goal of this junior-high, semester course offering is to familiarize students with the elements of theatre. With an active, fun, and hands-on approach, students will learn theatre terms and participate in a variety of acting exercises, including those meant to develop energy, focus, and improvisational skills. Students will write original scenes as well as act in established scenes for in-class performances. Each student is required to participate in a formal production to be presented during an evening in May, which will be produced and directed by the upperclassmen enrolled in the department’s intermediate theatre courses as their final project (1 Semester).

The purpose of this semester course offering is to introduce the high school student to the formal elements of theatre arts and stagecraft. Students will learn basic theatre principles in stage movement, acting techniques, character development, voice, diction, pantomime, and improvisation while practicing techniques to overcome stage-fright and develop self confidence. Students will write and perform original scenes as well as study the works of major playwrights. Each student is required to participate in a formal production to be presented during an evening TBA, in conjunction with the Junior High Theatre class (0.5 Credit).

The purpose of this interdisciplinary semester course is to introduce students to the methods of playwriting for theatrical production. Students examine processes that include, but are not limited to concept, research, development, dramatic form structure, and character development. The course is interdisciplinary in nature because it draws upon the essential elements of creative writing and narrative structures as explored in the English curriculum. Students will participate in theatre exercises in search for writing material. Students read and analyze several plays from a production perspective. Students study the method for creating a rough draft through final draft process, casting, and staged readings leading to informal play and possible formal production (0.5 Credit INTERDISCIPLINARY).

The purpose of this semester course is to familiarize students with the major principles of play directing. Through script analysis, students become familiar with the structure of a play as a basis on which the various elements of theatre can be organized to achieve dramatic unity. Students will learn the techniques employed by a director to communicate with actors and audience, including principles of composition, movement, stage business, and rhythm. Directing of fellow students in the class is an organic part of instruction. A prerequisite of this course is the successful completion of the introductory theatre course (0.5 Credit).

This course is designed for students with an appreciation for music and wishing to learn how to play an instrument. All students are welcome and encouraged to learn to play an instrument. Individual assessment of performance level will insure appropriate level placement. Students will learn the fundamentals of instrumental performance and musical development. Topics include proper breathing techniques, embouchure, posture, tone production, and music notation. Students will develop skills related to performing together as an ensemble and as an individual. Ensemble will be showcased, and students are required to perform in at least two performances during the school year (TBA). Available instrument instruction for: flute, oboe, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, F horn, trombone, baritone horn, tuba, percussion. Most instruments are student-rented and a rental informational session will be held at the beginning of the school year (Full Year.

This course is designed for students with an appreciation for music and wishing to learn how to play an instrument. All students are welcome and encouraged to learn to play an instrument. Students will learn the fundamentals of instrumental performance and musical development. Topics include proper breathing techniques, embouchure, posture, tone production, and music notation. Students will develop skills related to performing together as an ensemble and as an individual. Ensemble will be showcased in at least two performances during the school year. Available instrument instruction for: flute, oboe, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, F horn, trombone, baritone horn, tuba, percussion. Most instruments are rented and a rental informational night will be held at the beginning of the school year (1 Credit).

This intermediate course is designed to further student musical content and skills as developed in the foundational Beginner Band course. As such, previous playing experience and instrument proficiency is required. Students will study the fundamentals of instrumental performance in an ensemble setting. Students will perform music from myriad time periods and genres in developing important ensemble performance practices. While private lessons are not required, they are strongly encouraged for more in-depth individual instrument study. The ensemble will be showcased in at least two performances during the school year. Students will be expected to provide an instrument or rent an instrument, and a rental informational session will be held at the beginning of the school year (1 Credit).

This semester course serves as an introduction to music theory through analyzing performed and notated music. This course requires a significant interest in learning music theory as it relates to the piano / keyboard. Following an integrated and cumulative process, students will explore concepts like pitch, rhythm, form, tuning, single line melody, chord accompaniment, and musical design as applied through piano / keyboard musicianship. Each week progressive, step-by-step assignments will include tips on technique, a melodic performance piece and a popular tune to exercise the new chords learned. Focus will be given to music history, music appreciation, reading and interpreting basic notation, solfeggio, and piano / keyboard skills. Students will be required to attend at least two school performances during the school year (0.5 Credit).

This semester course serves as an introduction to music theory through analyzing performed and notated music. This course requires a significant interest in learning music theory as it relates to the guitar. Following an integrated and cumulative process, students will explore concepts like pitch, rhythm, form, tuning, single line melody, chord accompaniment, and musical design as applied through guitar musicianship. Each week progressive, step-by-step assignments will include tips on technique, a melodic performance piece and a popular tune to exercise the new chords learned. Focus will be given to music history, music appreciation, reading and interpreting basic notation, solfeggio, and guitar skills. Students must have their own guitar, and will be required to attend at least two school performances during the school year (0.5 Credit).

This interdisciplinary semester course is designed to cover a concise history of Western Music, beginning with tonal music as developed and perfected by J. S. Bach and moving into the world cultural influences of 20th century music and jazz. The course is interdisciplinary in nature as it incorporates the historical-critical methodologies of inquiry as developed in the Social Studies curriculum. Periods of history will be examined through the lens of music including: the Renaissance, Baroque era, the Age of Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, Classical era, Opulent Era/Gilded Age, Neo-classicism, Impressionism, Nationalism/Isolationism, and World Wars. These essential questions will also be addressed in the course: How was the political culture of a period reflected in the music? Was this music a catalyst, or simply a byproduct of the era? As colonialism spread, borders changed, and identities shifted, how were the musics of a culture affected? What results of these political, socio-economic, and geographic changes are heard in the music of today? (0.5 Credit INTERDISCIPLINARY)

The goal of this College Board Advanced Placement course is to engage students in music theory collegiate coursework in preparing for the AP Music Theory exam. This course is designed for advanced instrumental or choral students learning the fundamentals of arranging, composition, and advanced music theory. Topics of study include: musicianship, theory, and musical materials and procedures. Musicianship skills, including dictation and listening skills, sight-singing, and harmony, are an important part of the course. Through the course, students develop the ability to recognize, understand, and describe basic materials and processes of tonal music that are heard or presented in a score. Development of aural (listening) skills is a primary objective. Performance is also part of the curriculum through the practice of sight-singing. Students learn basic concepts and terminology by listening to and performing a wide variety of music. Students enrolled in this course must take the AP Music Theory exam at the end of the academic year. Admission to this elective College Board AP course requires the recommendation of the student’s most recent music teacher and department chair approval (1 Credit).

This course is designed for students with an appreciation for music and wishing to learn how to sing. All students are welcome and encouraged to learn to sing. Students will learn the fundamentals of vocal tone production and musical development. Topics of study include: proper breathing, vocal technique, music notation, rhythm, basic piano skills, and solfeggio. Students will develop skills related to performing together as an ensemble and as an individual. Ensemble will be showcased, and students are required to perform in at least two performances during the school year which will be determined later (Full Year).

All students are welcome and encouraged to learn to sing. Students will learn the fundamentals of vocal tone production and musical development. Topics of study include: proper breathing, vocal technique, music notation, rhythm, basic piano skills, and solfeggio. Students will develop skills related to performing together as an ensemble and as an individual. Ensemble will be showcased, and students are required to perform in at least two performances during the school year. Dates are to be determined later (1 Credit).

The purpose of this semester course is to provide students with an introductory experience of dance through the exploration of the fundamentals of stylized movement. The basic skills of Jazz Dance, Ballet, Hip Hop, and Modern Dance will be emphasized alongside the historical developments of these dance forms. In addition to the physical aspects of stimulating student physical flexibility and coordination, students learn the relevant nomenclature and terminology of the professional dance industry (0.5 Credit).

The goal of this semester course is to advance the curricular concepts established in Discovering Dance through a more in-depth experience of Jazz Dance, Ballet, and Modern Dance. Designed for the experienced dance student in mind, this course emphasizes ensemble and choreographed dance through multiple genres. Routines are more complex and require the execution of practiced technique. Self-assessment and dance critique are core elements of this course in establishing an appreciation for the professional art form. Students will be required to participate in at least one public performance. A prerequisite of this course is successful completion of Discovering Dance, or alternatively, students may audition per department guidelines (0.5 Credit).


Fine Arts Department

Fine Arts presentation for Virtual Open House