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  Name Title
Jennifer Palumbo Palumbo, Jennifer Science Teacher
Alexis Roche Roche, Alexis Science Teacher
Thomas Ronan Ronan, Thomas Science Teacher/ Track Coach
Rita Somi Somi, Rita Science Department Chair
Nick Villani Villani, Nick Science Teacher/ Cross Country Coach
SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

Life Science Grade 7 Full Year

The goal of this course is to engage students in the fundamentals of biology and equip them with the necessary skills for further study at the high school level. This life science course investigates the diversity, complexity, and interconnectedness of life on Earth. Topics of study include scientific inquiry and method, cell structure, organisms, and ecosystems.

Physical Science Grade 8 Full Year

Building upon the curricular concepts advanced in Grade 7 Life Science, this course engages students in the discussion and application of scientific inquiry and skills with particular attention paid to the research of scientists through the study of matter, solids, liquids, and gases, energy, heat, atomic structure, elements, solutions and chemical reactions. Hands-on and applied lab work and demonstrations are used to reinforce scientific theories and learning objectives.

Biology Grade 9 1 Credit

The goal of this course is to introduce key concepts of chemistry that will apply throughout the study of life. Through the study of cells, students will be able to identify the theme of correlation between structure and function, understand life at the cellular level, and trace the history of genetics from Mendel to DNA technology. This course begins with a review of the science of biology and an in-depth study of the chemistry of life at the cellular level, including cell physiology, photosynthesis and respiration, cell reproduction and genetics. It also focuses on DNA and genetic engineering. Coursework is engaged through lecture and lab-based activities.

Biology II Grade 10 1 Credit

This course utilizes the basic biological vocabulary and concepts presented in Biology I to explore in an advanced, in-depth manner the biological topics of ecology, evolution theory, modern classification systems, microbiotic organisms, fungi, plant anatomy and physiology, and human systems. This lecture-styled course is augmented with accompanying lab activities including laboratory dissections to illustrate the structure and function of organisms.

Chemistry Grade 11 1 Credit

The purpose of this course is to prepare students for the first year of collegiate chemistry. Students will be introduced to the systematic and scientific study of the physical and chemical properties of matter and the energy changes associated with these properties. The major emphasis of this course will be on problem-solving skills associated with the main principles important to the understanding of chemistry. Laboratory investigations and reports using the scientific method are required to better understand the concepts of chemistry.

AP Biology Grade 10 – 12 1 Credit

The purpose of this College Board Advanced Placement Biology course is to engage students in collegiate level coursework and encourage the development of a broad and sophisticated understanding of Biology, and the skills necessary to succeed on the AP Biology exam. Topics of study include biochemistry, cell structure and function, genetics, molecular basis of inheritance, DNA, gene regulation and expression, evolution, classification, animals, and ecology. Furthermore, the above topics are integrated throughout the course using the four key foci: evolution, energetics, information storage and transmission, and system interactions. This is a laboratory course in which students are expected to use collected data to solve biological problems. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Biology exam at the end of the academic year. Prerequisites include the recommendation of the student’s most recent science teacher and department chair approval.

AP Chemistry Grade 11 – 12 1 Credit

The purpose of this College Board Advanced Placement Chemistry course is to engage students in collegiate level coursework and encourage the development of a broad and sophisticated understanding of Chemistry, and the skills necessary to succeed on the AP Chemistry exam. Coursework involves a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemistry problems with an emphasis on chemical calculations and the mathematical formulation of principles, and on intensive hands-on laboratory work done by students. Lab reports and problem solving using dimensional analysis are stressed throughout the program. Topics of study include: chemical elements, chemical and physical properties of materials, changes in matter, rates of chemical reactions, laws of thermodynamics, chemical bonds and intermolecular attraction. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Chemistry exam at the end of the academic year. Prerequisites include the recommendation of the student’s most recent science teacher and department chair approval.

Physics Grade 11 – 12 1 Credit

The purpose of this course is to expand the critical thinking and reasoning skills of students through a focused study of the conceptual foundations of physics. Employing both previously acquired and new mathematics skills in problem solving, students will engage in a comprehensive introduction to classical mechanics: motion, forces, energy, and the laws that govern them. As time permits, topics of electricity, optics, sound and heat may also be introduced. Algebra, trigonometry, data manipulation, graphing, and the use of graphing calculators is routine. Demonstrations, hands-on activities and projects are incorporated to reinforce the theory.

AP Physics C: Electricity & Magnetism Grade 11 – 12 1 Credit

The purpose of this College Board Advanced Placement Physics C course is to engage students in collegiate level coursework and encourage the development of a broad and sophisticated understanding of Physics, and the skills necessary to succeed on the AP Physics C exam. This course is calculus-based. Topics of study include kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion (work, energy, and power): systems of particles and linear momentum: circular motion and rotation: oscillations: and gravitation. Mechanics include a hands-on laboratory component comparable to a semester-long introductory collegelevel physics laboratory. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Chemistry exam at the end of the academic year. Prerequisites include the recommendation of the student’s most recent science teacher and department chair approval.

Anatomy & Physiology Grade 11 – 12 1 Credit

The goal of this course is to provide students with a foundational understanding of the anatomy and function of the individual human body and its systems. A brief review of critical biology and chemistry topics serves as the beginning reference point from which this course explores individual body systems. Topics of study include: an in-depth discussion of the anatomy and physiology of body systems such as integumentary (skin), skeletal, muscle, respiratory, cardiovascular and reproductive. A dissection of a mammal will be used to illustrate the structure and function of human systems.

Biotechnology Grade 11 – 12 1 Credit

The purpose of this course is to develop student understanding of modern biotechnology concepts through the applied knowledge gained from biology and chemistry. Employing a comprehensive approach to scientific method, students engage a variety of industry specific experiments and critical thinking skill sets. Topics of study include: genetic engineering, gene splicing, stem cells, cloning, genetic diseases, DNA, and the use of biotechnology in the environment and in industry. Prerequisites include successful completion of Biology and Chemistry, and the recommendation of the student’s most recent science teacher.

Microbiology Grade 11 – 12 1 Credit

The purpose of this course is to foster student understanding of the basic principles of microbiology, preparing them to engage collegiate studies in health careers. Fostering student appreciation for the role microscopic organisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoans) in everyday life and the workplace, this course evaluates the potential personal, social, and economic impact of genetically engineered microorganisms. Students develop knowledge of terminology, concepts, and principles pertinent to the field. Using a laboratory approach to learning, this course provides activities integrating language arts, mathematics, history, and technology with fundamental scientific principles. Emphasis will be placed on scientific method, cooperative learning, proper laboratory techniques and safety. Prerequisites include successful completion of Biology and Chemistry, and the recommendation of the student’s most recent science teacher.
 

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